solar panels

Solar panels are composed of solar cells, which can convert solar energy in sunlight into electric energy. Because solar cells can generate electricity directly from sunlight, it is the most reliable of all our power generation technologies, which is why solar cells are widely used in space and some remote areas where it is difficult to solve problems.

Solar panels are composed of solar cells, which can convert solar energy in sunlight into electric energy. Because solar cells can generate electricity directly from sunlight, it is the most reliable of all our power generation technologies, which is why solar cells are widely used in space and some remote areas where it is difficult to solve problems.
How do solar cells work?
Solar cells consist of silicon atoms. You can think of atoms as building blocks - like Lego blocks, but because atoms are so small, you need special tools to see them. Solar cells come from a layer of silicon wafers, which are similar in size to dinner plates, but much thinner - only about three times thicker than ordinary hair.
Turning the silicon crystal layer into a solar panel requires a special preparation process. The silicon crystal layer should be heated to 1000 ℃, and then a layer of metal sheet should be placed on the back of the layer. At the same time, a layer of metal mesh with holes should be covered on the solar cell and let this surface rush to the sun.
When 60 solar cells are prepared, they will be fixed on a layer of glass to make solar panels. Generally speaking, the solar power supply system on the roof has 10-50 solar panels, while millions of solar panels are installed in rural solar power plants.
Every silicon atom contains very small and light electrons with weak charges. When sunlight falls on a solar panel, it hits one of the electrons and takes it out of its orbit. These hit electrons can move freely, but the special structure of the battery makes the electrons move only in one direction towards the sun.
Therefore, when the sun falls on the solar cell, many electrons will break away from their orbit and become free electrons. Because of the characteristics of the solar cell, electrons can only move upward, resulting in an electric current that can drive household appliances.
The stronger the sunlight falling on the solar cell, the more electrons will be knocked out of their orbit, and the greater the current generated. If the weather is not clear, the number of electrons hit will be reduced and the current generated will be reduced by 75% or more. At night, the solar panel will not produce any electric energy. At this time, the power supply completely depends on the battery or other power sources.
How should we use solar cells?
Solar cells are the cheapest way to generate electricity - even cheaper than a new thermal power plant or nuclear power plant. This is why the global installation rate of solar cells is five times that of coal power and 20 times that of nuclear power.
In Australia, the newly built power stations are basically solar power plants or wind power plants. Electric vehicles using solar and wind power can replace polluting gasoline vehicles. Solar and wind power generation can also be used for house heating and cooling, replacing the traditional coal and natural gas heating.
The use of solar and wind energy can help reduce greenhouse gas emissions that cause damage to the earth. Compared with other energy sources, the cost of solar and wind energy is very low and will become lower; If we use more wind or solar energy, we can accelerate the reduction of the use of traditional energy (such as coal, oil and natural gas) that harm the earth.
In addition, silicon atom is the second largest atom in the world (the first is oxygen atom). In fact, most sand and stones are made of silicon and oxygen, so we can't use up all the silicon for the preparation of solar cells.